‘You May Want to Marry My Husband’ Author Amy Krouse Rosenthal Dies at 51

Skip navigation! Story from Wellness. She was Amy Krouse Rosenthal is an author of children’s books, grown-up books, and short videos. She likes making wishes, salads, and connections with the universe, according to her personal website. She’s a wife and a mother. And she is dying. Rosenthal found out that she has ovarian cancer in late , the same day she and her husband sent their youngest child off to college, she wrote in a personal essay in the New York Times. In that same essay, she makes a convincing case for the next woman who dates her husband.

Late Author Wrote a Dating Profile for Her Husband Before Her Death: How Her Family Is Responding

Amy Kourse Rosenthal passed away on March 13, but not before she did something unusually beautiful and heartwarming. The piece touched millions of readers and received such profoundly positive feedback, her family has been able to reciprocate the love through charity. To celebrate and honor her, we have created the AKR Yellow Umbrella Foundation, which will provide funding for ovarian cancer research as well as child literacy, causes important to Amy,” the family said in a statement to People magazine.

As for the essay, though it hit home for millions of readers, no one was more captivated by it than Jason. When I read her words for the first time, I was shocked at the beauty, slightly surprised at the incredible prose given her condition and, of course, emotionally ripped apart. In fact, many readers have reached out to the family with messages of love and support after reading the epic love story.

Dear Amy: I recently discovered that my husband has been on several dating sites. He said he was bored and wanted to see what’s out.

Author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal touched readers’ hearts last year when she wrote a heartbreaking dating profile for her husband, Jason Rosenthal, just days before dying of ovarian cancer. Now, in a candid TED Talk , Jason Rosenthal is opening up about his late wife’s final days and how he’s learning to find joy again after losing his companion of more than 26 years. I will never get that image out of my head. The tender, funny essay acted as a kind of personal ad for Jason, who, she knew, would soon be a widower.

I did it in one day,” Amy wrote, recalling the couple’s first blind date nearly three decades before. She described Jason as thoughtful, handy and handsome. I felt so strong.

Dying author Amy Krouse Rosenthal writes dating profile for husband Jason

Popular author Amy Krouse Rosenthal, who gained legions of new fans after penning a dating profile for her husband in The New York Times , has lost her battle with ovarian cancer. Rosenthal had long delighted children with her books including “Duck! She wrote the would-be personal ad for Jason Rosenthal and also noted her fatal diagnosis.

Commentary: Author Amy Krouse Rosenthal has terminal ovarian cancer. She wants women to swipe right on her husband.

Amy Krouse Rosenthal, the children’s book author whose emotional “Modern Love” column about her husband recently went viral, died of cancer on Monday, her literary agent confirmed to TIME. Rosenthal’s recent New York Times column, titled ” You May Want to Marry My Husband ,” explained her ovarian cancer diagnosis and served as both a love letter and dating profile for her husband of 26 years.

I want more time with my children. But that is not going to happen,” Rosenthal, 51, wrote in the column, which was published March 3. So why I am doing this? Rosenthal was the author of 28 children’s books and a memoir, Textbook Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Katie Reilly. Mar 13, All rights reserved. TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website.

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You May Want to Marry My Husband

According to The Associated Press , Amy Krouse Rosenthal, who was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in , died Monday, her literary agent confirmed. She was She then described her husband of 26 years in a mock dating profile.

His terminally ill wife famously wrote a dating profile for him just days before Jason’s late wife, Amy Krouse Rosenthal, was fighting ovarian.

May 28 What Happens to Nonessential Workers? May 28 The Desensitization to Antisemitism in America. May 26 The Future of Education. May 25 Waking Nightmares. Anthony Keatts , Reporter June 5, Amy Krouse Rosenthal a fifty-one-year-old author and filmmaker who died in March 13, Her death was caused by ovarian cancer.

She told the public about her cancer by writing an essay in the New York Times. The essay was written in the form of a dating profile—but for her husband. Here is a small excerpt from what she wrote. Want to hear a sick joke?

ASK AMY: ‘Bored’ husband’s dating site profiles has wife worried

Rosenthal had been diagnosed in with ovarian cancer. Fellow author John Green tweeted: “She was a brilliant writer, and an even better friend. A Chicago native and longtime resident, Rosenthal completed than more 30 books, including journals, memoirs and the best-selling picture stories Uni the Unicorn ‘ and Duck! She also raised three children and had a flair for random acts of kindness, whether hanging dollar bills from a tree or leaving notes on ATM machines.

If it resonates or plants some seeds, great,” she told Chicago magazine in Amy Krouse Rosenthal beckoned loveliness.

Author Amy Krouse Rosenthal dies of cancer after creating heartbreaking dating profile for her husband. A Chicago native and longtime.

NEW YORK — Amy Krouse Rosenthal, a popular author, filmmaker and speaker who brightened lives with her wide-eyed and generous spirit — and broke hearts when she wrote of being terminally ill and leaving behind her husband Jason — died Monday at age Rosenthal had been diagnosed in with ovarian cancer.

A Chicago native and longtime resident, Rosenthal completed more than 30 books, including journals, memoirs and the bestselling picture stories Uni the Unicorn and Duck! She also raised three children and had a flair for random acts of kindness, whether hanging dollar bills from a tree or leaving notes on ATM machines. While her books were noted for their exuberant tone, she started a very different conversation early this month with a widely read Modern Love column she wrote for The New York Times.

Rosenthal told of learning about her fatal diagnosis, and, in the form of a dating profile, offered tribute to Jason Brian Rosenthal. This is a man who, because he is always up early, surprises me every Sunday morning by making some kind of oddball smiley face out of items near the coffeepot: a spoon, a mug, a banana. Rosenthal more than kept her word; starting in the late s, she regularly published at least a book a year, and sometimes three or four.

Rennert said Monday that she had completed seven more picture books before her death, including a collaboration with her daughter, Paris, called Dear Girl. Rosenthal loved experimenting with different media, and blending the virtual and physical worlds. One of her favourite projects began with a YouTube video, 17 Things I Made, featuring everything from books she had written to her three children to a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

Dying author writes dating profile for her husband

NEW YORK — Amy Krouse Rosenthal, a popular author, filmmaker and speaker who brightened lives with her wide-eyed and generous spirit — and broke hearts when she wrote of being terminally ill and leaving behind her husband Jason — died Monday at age Rosenthal had been diagnosed in with ovarian cancer. She also raised three children and had a flair for random acts of kindness, whether hanging dollar bills from a tree or leaving notes on ATM machines.

Rosenthal told of learning about her fatal diagnosis, and, in the form of a dating profile, offered tribute to Jason Brian Rosenthal. This is a man who, because he is always up early, surprises me every Sunday morning by making some kind of oddball smiley face out of items near the coffeepot: a spoon, a mug, a banana. Rosenthal more than kept her word; starting in the late s, she regularly published at least a book a year, and sometimes three or four.

Dying author Amy Krouse Rosenthal writes moving dating profile for husband The essay was titled, “You May Want to Marry My Husband”.

Rosenthal, who has authored two dozen children’s picture books and a recent memoir, said she has been married to Jason Rosenthal for 26 years. She lives in Chicago, according to her website. An author fighting ovarian cancer who may not have long to live has offered up her husband in a tear-jerking essay: “If you’re looking for a dreamy, let’s-go-for-it travel companion, Jason is your man. It didn’t take long for her essay to go viral online.

Rosenthal, 51, wrote that she’s gone weeks without real food and falls asleep mid-sentence because of the morphine she needs. Despite feeling weak, she said she had to write the essay while she still could, because she wanted him to fall in love again after she is gone. Those who know him – or just happen to glance down at the gap between his dress slacks and dress shoes – know that he has a flair for fabulous socks.

He is fit and enjoys keeping in shape. She wrote that on Sept.

Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Commentary: Author Amy Krouse Rosenthal has terminal ovarian cancer. She wants women to swipe right on her husband. Technically Incorrect offers a slightly twisted take on the tech that’s taken over our lives. Rosenthal is dying of ovarian cancer. She loves her husband.

Mar 20, – Author Amy Krouse Rosenthal, who died today from ovarian cancer, recently penned a dating profile for her husband of 26 years, Jason.

Follow our live coverage for the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic. Amy Krouse Rosenthal, a popular author, filmmaker and speaker, has died at the age of 51, just over a week after she wrote an emotional essay about wanting to find someone to marry her husband Jason after her death. Rosenthal had been diagnosed in with ovarian cancer. Her death was confirmed by her longtime literary agent, Amy Rennert, who said Rosenthal “was the most life-affirming person, and love-affirming person”.

A Chicago native and longtime resident, Rosenthal completed more than 30 books, including journals, memoirs and the best-selling picture stories, Uni the Unicorn and Duck! While her books were noted for their exuberant tone, she started a very different conversation early this month with a widely-read column Modern Love she wrote for The New York Times. Rosenthal told of learning about her fatal diagnosis, and, in the form of a dating profile, offered tribute to Jason Brian Rosenthal.

He also has an affinity for tiny things: taster spoons, little jars, a mini-sculpture of a couple sitting on a bench, which he presented to me as a reminder of how our family began,” she wrote. This is a man who, because he is always up early, surprises me every Sunday morning by making some kind of oddball smiley face out of items near the coffeepot: a spoon, a mug, a banana. Rosenthal was a Tufts University graduate who worked in advertising for several years before she had what she called a “McEpiphany”.

She was with her three children at McDonald’s when she promised herself that she would leave advertising and become a writer. Rosenthal more than kept her word and starting in the late s, she regularly published at least a book a year, and sometimes three or four. Ms Rennert said Rosenthal had completed seven more picture books before her death, including a collaboration with her daughter, Paris, called Dear Girl. Rosenthal loved experimenting with different media, and blending the virtual and physical worlds.

Dying author pens heartbreaking dating profile for husband

Amy Krouse Rosenthal has ovarian cancer and said she hopes her partner, Jason, can find ‘another love story’. The news coincided with her third child going off to college and came as she was planning to go travelling with her husband. What follows is a list of the things Ms Rosenthal loves about her husband and why she believes he makes a good partner.

Popular author Amy Krouse Rosenthal gained a legion of new fans after penning a dating profile for her husband in “The New York Times.”.

Amy Krouse Rosenthal April 29, — March 13, was an American author of both adult and children’s books, a short film maker, and radio show host. Amy Krouse Rosenthal wrote for both adults and children. Her alphabetized memoir Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life published in was named one of Amazon’s top ten memoirs of the decade. It is the first book to include an interactive text-messaging component. Rosenthal made short films using her iPhone or Flip camera. Some invite further interaction from viewers, some are social experiments, and some build upon each other to become something else entirely.

Amy Krouse Rosenthal: Author who wrote dating profile tribute to husband dies

Chicago author Amy Krouse Rosenthal was dying of ovarian cancer when she wrote an essay about her beloved husband, Jason. She told readers how she fell in love with him in a day, how he showed up at her first ultrasound with flowers, how he still presented her with gum balls when he emerged from gas stations and minimarts. He reveled in art, live music and his kids, she wrote, and — bonus! Rosenthal wanted her husband to find love again when she was gone, and she was casting a wide net, with an essay framed as a call for candidates.

And many wondered, what would become of the man Rosenthal so vividly depicted as a real-life romantic hero?

No information is available for this page.

Her words were part love letter, part dating profile — a gift to her husband, Jason Rosenthal, that, at the very end, gave him permission to live life without her. How have you done that? How has writing this book helped you do that? She gave me such a tremendous gift in providing me that blank space. So, what comes to mind is the pivot I made in my professional life.

I really reflected on a lot of time away from the office while I was taking care of Amy and spent a lot of moments, quiet moments, thinking about what I was doing in my life and whether it was meaningful to me anymore. I worked six days a week for almost 30 years being a lawyer and in the real estate business, and that slowly became less important to me.

So, I think that [the blank space] gave me permission to focus on things that were more meaningful. As I started to review those things, they reminded me why I was trying to convey a lot of the messages in this book. People experience loss; they just do. And those losses take different forms. But at the end of the day, we feel a deep sense of emotion and want to connect with each other. What do you hope will be the response to this book? At first, I was a little bit devastated.

Wife Made Dating Profile for Husband Before Passing ft. Gina Darling